South Carolina Cattle

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South Carolina ranked 38th in all of the fifty states for beef cattle productions with 222,000 animals in 2004. The highest number of beef cows that have calved on record for South Carolina was 336,000 in 1977. The lowest number recorded in the state was 15,000 in 1939.

Today there are many different cattle breeds in the world, all stemming on one ancestor, the aurochs. In 1623, two Devon heifers and a Devon bull were imported to the Plymouth Colony from Britain. These three cattle were probably the first purebred cattle to reach North America.

The United States and Australia are the top beef producing countries in the world. The United States produces about 25% of the world's beef supply with less than 10% of the world's cattle population. Over 900 different breeds of cattle have been reported in the world. Breed associations maintain breed registrations for many of the individual breeds, with some cattle breeds being able to trace their ancestry back 600 years or more. Many of the beef cattle produced in the United States today are crossbred.

The demand for beef has significantly increased in the past few years because of consistent quality, consumer changes in taste and preferences such as high protein diets, and innovative products and advertising. Per capita consumption of beef is over 66 pounds per person per year and beef is consumed 77.8 million times a day across America.

 

  USDA Livestock Market Reports

South Carolina Livestock Weekly Review

Williamston Livestock Auction (Mon)

Saluda Livestock Auction (Mon)

Chester Livestock Auction (Tue)

Chesnee Livestock Auction (Tue)

Orangeburg Livestock Auction (Wed)

Williamston Livestock Auction Wtd Avg (Mon)

Chester Livestock Wtd Avg Report (Tue)

Saluda Livestock Auction Wtd Avg Report (Mon)

Chesnee Livestock Auction Wtd Avg Report (Tue)


cattletoday.xml

TAKE STEPS TO REDUCE SHRINK WHEN WORKING CATTLE
One of the largest overlooked costs for stockmen when selling cattle is shrink. For example, if you are taking calves to a feeder calf sale, to be weighed off the truck and a two percent pencil shrink taken, those calves may have already lost six percent or more of their weight just getting them to market, resulting in at least eight percent shrink deducted from your paycheck.
BE PREPARED TO ENSURE A SUCCESSFUL CALVING SEASON
The fall calving season has kicked off, but are you really prepared for it? Here are a few of the important things to have handy for a successful calving season.
RESEARCHERS STUDY GENES TO ASSIST IN CATTLE BREEDING
Beef cattle selection may soon be as easy as looking at a cow's genes.
FOCUS ON GOOD MANAGEMENT OF A.I. PROGRAMS
The use of artificial insemination in beef cow operations has never reached anywhere near the acceptance of that of the dairy industry. The reasons for this bear discussion as they typically relate to many of the problems we encounter with A.I. in beef herds.
COMPOSITE BULLS HAVE BECOME POPULAR IN SOME AREAS
Heterosis (hybrid vigor) has proven its value in many agricultural sectors—whether production of hybrid corn, hogs or beef. There are three kinds of heterosis; individual (the calf), maternal, and paternal. Of the three, paternal heterosis has had the least attention.
HUNTIN' DAYLIGHT - SHRINKING HAY LOSSES
Expanding beef production and looming increased calf numbers continue to pressure cattle prices lower, further and faster than many expected.
LOOK AT ALTERNATIVES THAT CAN REDUCE ANTIBIOTIC DEPENDENCE
The handwriting on the wall has become pretty clear. Justified or not, the use of antibiotics in managing the beef animal, at any stage of production, is becoming more challenging.
IT'S THE PITTS -- YOU NEVER KNOW
The bull business is very competitive and purebred people play to win. Because there's a limited number of buyers, breeders spend a fortune on color ads and hire their own field men to exhort ranchers to come to their sale. I knew one breeder who passed out a hundred dollar bill for every bull a ranch manager bought, and once I even saw a bull breeder buy the county fair show steer that belonged to the granddaughter of a large rancher hoping it would pay off.
MAKE A GOOD INVESTMENT WHEN BUYING BULLS
Are you sifting through stacks of bull sale catalogs looking for your next bull? While bull selection can be a daunting task, your choice will impact your herd for years to come. Thus, taking some time to think about what you need from your next herd sire is important.
ADVANCEMENTS IN EPDS IMPROVE ACCURACY
It was about 40 years ago that the beef industry was introduced to the Expected Progeny Difference (EPD). In the early days, data were limited and based on comparisons with a few reference sires used in designed programs. There has been much progress in the methods used to calculate EPDs, and today most breed associations provide EPDs on all animals in the breed. After 40 years, there is still confusion over how to use these tools.
ANNUAL FOOD PLOTS PROVIDE NUTRITIONAL BENEFITS
When planting wildlife food plots, which is better: annuals or perennials? Ideally, you should have different plots designated for both cool- and warm-season annuals, as well as perennials.
PLAN VACCINATION PROGRAM BEFORE BREEDING SEASON
Some diseases affect reproduction, in bulls as well as in cows. It's best to try to prevent these diseases by making sure the cows and bulls have adequate immunity before breeding season.
18TH HERDBUILDER REPLACEMENT FEMALE SALE AVERAGES $2,086
The 18th Annual Herdbuilder Replacement Female Sale was held August 26th at Alabama Livestock Auction in Uniontown, Ala.
BREEDING SOUNDNESS EXAM CAN PREVENT FINANCIAL WRECK
The importance of a breeding soundness exam in herd bulls can prevent costly revenue losses, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service economist.
S.E. BRANGUS FIELD DAY HELD IN GEORGIA
The International Brangus Breeders Association (IBBA) was represented by five staff members at the Southeastern Brangus Field Day, on Thursday, August 11 through Saturday, August 13, in Grantville, Georgia.

 

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Lowline vs Square Meater
by City Guy (Posted Fri, 30 Sep 2016 04:28:59 GMT+5)
Genetically, from what I have read, MGs are 99% Angus and LLs are 100% Angus, so there is probably little difference. Both have XLNT marbling and REA/CWT. Only draw back is they have to be direct marketed.



Grass on new land
by Beefy (Posted Fri, 30 Sep 2016 04:28:07 GMT+5)
Same here. Trying to decide between 9, quik, and 85. The bahias are going to take over anyway unless I fight them with spray all the time plus they will reseed themselves there and wherever I feed. I've heard lots of good things about the quik except the price. I need something resistant to a leveling harrow on account of hogs.



Free car
by Beefy (Posted Fri, 30 Sep 2016 04:12:02 GMT+5)
Who won the free cars? Once again I'm late to tha party



Proof of Global Warming
by Jogeephus (Posted Fri, 30 Sep 2016 04:03:25 GMT+5)
Ebenezer wrote:Problem now, you don't know if the one wearing them is a him or a her. Times change.

They seem to be very confused themselves.



Calf with foot/walking problem
by wbvs58 (Posted Fri, 30 Sep 2016 03:05:41 GMT+5)
When they first get up after resting they are often OK but walking on their tippy toes. It doesn't take much, fatigue and they flick over and are then on the front of their fetlock. I find the cow knows of their disability and will keep them off to the side for a bit longer. As the days go on the time they are standing upright will increase. Keeping them away from the main herd so they can work things out at their own pace I find is best.

Ken



Hello Everyone
by Johnson555 (Posted Fri, 30 Sep 2016 01:25:52 GMT+5)
Hello everybody,
Thank you so much....



What are you eating today?
by Alan (Posted Fri, 30 Sep 2016 01:08:01 GMT+5)
That's a great looking plate Jo and yes anyone who leaves hungry has more of a problem than not being able to enjoy good food.



Does Rock music no longer exist?
by boondocks (Posted Fri, 30 Sep 2016 00:31:00 GMT+5)
Just saw this thread and can't let it die on the vine without pointing you toward nathaniel rateliff and the night sweats:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1iAYhQsQhSY



Bull & bred heifers picture
by Commercialfarmer (Posted Thu, 29 Sep 2016 23:36:36 GMT+5)
Blue sky, good stand of green grass and nice conditioned cattle, what's not to like?



Saturaday
by f1tiger (Posted Thu, 29 Sep 2016 22:47:20 GMT+5)
My father in law down in Kountze would fry the squirrels and we would have cat head biscuits and sawmill gravy or tomato gravy,now that was east Texas cooking ; worked with a gentleman ( maybe redneck) that brought a gallon bag of fried squirrel heads on the flight over to Saudi, stewardess told him he could not eat them on the plane and he replied as he got his carry on down with another bag of fried heads and said I have enough for everyone



Immunity
by regolith (Posted Thu, 29 Sep 2016 22:39:15 GMT+5)
What I've been told, about clostridia specifically, is that the colostrum provides passive immunity that starts to fade about 3 - 4 weeks, which is why vaccinating really young isn't effective... I vaccinate at around 4 weeks at the earliest.
A lot of dairy farmers put off vaccinating till the whole group is about 4 months old & can get their clostridia, worm drench and lepto all at once.
Just being blunt, they're risking losing their top calves to blackleg, leaving it that late.

I think you can vaccinate your calf any time now for clostridia - ask your vet, there's types that provide immediate protection and the regular vaccine works by stimulating the calf to form its own antibodies, and is slower in action.
Exposure to life will enable the calf to form immunity, right from birth. What your calf lacks is the maternal protection to stressors/infection; getting sick is often a culmination of a whole host of factors in which the infectious agent isn't irrelevant... it's just not the whole story.



Road kill
by skyhightree1 (Posted Thu, 29 Sep 2016 22:38:24 GMT+5)
I get road kill deer all the time and put in my dog pens for them to eat them. The state would thank me so they don't have to pick them up. Troopers here use to tag deer for folks wanting to take it up they may still do it.



If this isn't a sign, I don't know what is.
by skyhightree1 (Posted Thu, 29 Sep 2016 22:31:46 GMT+5)
Aaron wrote:ClinchValley wrote:You folks think they will be even cheaper in '17? I was wanting/thinking of freeing some capital to buy some cheap breeds this fall/winter. But if it looks like they will be even cheaper in '17. Should a man hold off?

If the opportunity presents itself, I would be buying heifer calves or open yearling heifers. I think breds will be around $800-1200 US next year. Just wait until the bankruptcies start rolling in...

I will start buying in November to Feb when most people are cutting some so they can save on hay. Should you hold off ??? IMO No you never know what tomorrow brings However I do know tomorrow or even 17 will not be bringing any 2.00 calves.

Aaron that's how much breds are bringing now in my area. I agree I bet farm cattle equip will be flooding farm sales next year. I wish I could be a thought in the guys heads that bought heifers 2600 each right before market crash.



This might be where I start
by Ojp6 (Posted Thu, 29 Sep 2016 22:25:59 GMT+5)
Brute 23 wrote:angus9259 wrote:What people ask for cattle and what they get for cattle are two different things. The original craigslist ad you posted has been up for a month so folks have had at least a month to get at these heifers before you and no one has. That to me says they are not a GREAT deal. Doesn't mean it's a bad deal if that's what you want. It just means that you were willing to pay more for those cattle than anyone else who read that ad. A great deal is something you could repost on craigslist and potentially get your money back or make a little. The fact that this ad has been up a month says you won't be likely to do that. HOWEVER, that DOES NOT make it a bad deal FOR YOU if they are what you want.

I agree 100%. Nothing good sits for a month like that. There is a reason.

Some times they leave the add up even though those have been sold to pawn off some others they may be willing to part with.

I thought this was a good deal especially if you could talk them down a little. Bred to Herf, Char, and Ang.



I'd bet those cows are put together, and no set of put together cows is worth within 200 of that at this point. That guy posts a lot of cows with back tag spots on them at different times.
The more breeds of bulls they say they are bred to the better chance they were put together generally.



Pics from last weekend
by Nesikep (Posted Thu, 29 Sep 2016 21:23:50 GMT+5)
Great pics!

Never did get to Yellowstone myself.. I did get off work a day while travelling and see Yosemite, which was quite nice as well.

Dumb tourists abound.. Let the Darwin awards happen... Around here we have a popular day-hike area.. Now Highway 99, which is a snaky 2 lane up a 5 mile long 12% grade has become the parking overflow.. So you have cars parked halfway on the road for 200 years on both sides of it.. Any guess as to what will happen if a truck coming down loaded meets a truck coming up?




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